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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 123 (some duplicates have been removed)
happens less than a year later. and the foreign policy effects and the economic effects which we are still living. so we don't really know because history's like this what the real number one foreign policy is going to be. we can guess. we have educated guesses but things happen that we don't anticipate. that's where the arab spring. september 11 and its implications. i would just argue that's why the character of whoever wins this election is so important. foreign policy, as clinical as we want it to be in many ways is a human undertaking. >> rose: this is very important. what do you mean by character. help us understand what character has to do in terms of what are we talking about. character with respect to the presidency. >> i think we saw in 2001 we had a president who had a stubborn streak, who had, was in a way radicalized by events in the autumn of 2001. >> rose: 9/11. >> he was against nation building before he was in favor of it. and because of the effects of that we are living in a world which is radically different. the great example would be world war ii where fdr said i'm a
do to achieve specific ends part of their goal in foreign policy and national security policy. that's what public diplomacy is supposed to do. now, if everybody loved us, it may be easier to achieve those goals, but it's really hard to get everybody to love us. that's a long term project, and generally, a futile project. it's much more important to do as president obama said right in the beginning from the inaugural speech that we need to focus on mutual interest and mutual respect, and there are many things that we can get done in that fashion. i think that discretionary -- diplomacy 230e cueses on specific, strategic goals, and if it failed in any way in the last several decades, it's been that it's not focused on those goals. >> i'm in agreement with jim on this issue. it's note a population contest, but it's absolutely the wrong -- the results are not great results if that's the measurement. one of the things that we tried to do, again, building on the base that jim and his team put in place was to be sure that everything we were doing in public diplomacy actually was designed t
adult cancer. onid cameron's speech foreign policy at the lord mayor's annual banquet. this will be his third time speaking at a banquet since becoming prime minister in 2010. join us for his remarks at 3:30 p.m. eastern. later at georgetown university, musician and activist bono talks about social enterprise and social movements, like his project red campaign. our coverage begins at 6:00 p.m. eastern. >> 2013 should be the year we begin to solve our debt through tax reform and entitlement reform. i am proposing that we avert the fiscal cliff together in a manner that ensures that 2013 is finally the year that our government comes to grips with a major problem -- the major problems that are facing us. >> i am open to compromise, i am open to new ideas, i am committed to solving our fiscal challenge. but i refuse to accept any approach that isn't balanced. i am not going to ask students and seniors and middle-class families to pay down the entire deficit while people like me making over $250,000 are not asked to pay a dime more in taxes. >> the newly elected congress starts work in janua
the argument on foreign policy in part because a lot of people are sick of the two wars that george w. bush got us into. that's just a fact. gorgeous george w. bush's type of republic party mitt romney as todd akin richard mourdock in another. >> very good with latinos, kevin mccarthy. we have some bright new leaders and we need to have more of those. >> george w. bush's policies spending and two wars ended up also delivering barack obama into the white house. but let's start with you, chip. your take where we are. what do you think of my point that romney ran a defensive campaign but he also did have to deal with the bush baggage, credibility on spending, and a foreign policy that was frankly the by product of the hopeful but ultimately rather confused and unsuccessful policy in the middle east? >> yeah. i think you are spot on. first, let me say i aspire to be one of those old white guys. >> laura: and rich. >> definitely be a rich old white guy no question. that's what i aspire to be. no question a heavy load for romney. to thine ownself be true. we know who we are as a party. center right p
of the most powerful voices of criticism of president obama when it comes to foreign policy. john kerry, same thing, but no place in politics, no elective office that mitt romney holds. i don't see where he easily fits back into the party. >> he can become a cable tv host. one of those networks out there. what do you think? you think he has -- a lot of the republican party today, he's gone, over, history. it sounded like a valedictory. he was sort of going to recede, did it twice. tried, lost and there were a lot of people who recorded him as a transitional figure even when he was nominee of the party. so i think he'll go back to business, maybe to bayne capital, who knows? i don't see politics in his future. >> what about paul ryan? will he just pick up where he left off? or do you see him broaden out? >> he has time. listen, he has something that is very hard for a house member to get and that is nationwide recognition. he is also a bonafide brainiac with budget things. you may not agree with what he likes to do with the budget, but he understand. so there is still a place for him there. he
. >> for more on what the president's reelection means for u.s. foreign policy, we are joined in the studio by markets of the swp german institute for international and security affairs here in berlin. are we likely to see a second attempt at a reset of relations with moscow? >> a couple of months ago, the u.s. president indicated through russian counterparts that after the election, he would have more flexibility -- the u.s. president indicated to his russian counterparts. i think there is more room for political initiatives. i think the cooperation will remain limited, given the domestic situation in russia. >> let me ask you -- the obama administration during its first four years shifted emphasis of u.s. policy to the asia-pacific. that reduced the significance of europe's importance. do you think we will see the same? >> absolutely. given the inward looking mode of u.s. society, given the financial constraints of the u.s., there is no alternative. the crucial question is -- will the europeans deliver? can they deliver in terms of financial contributions to international crisis managemen
it comes to foreign policy. john kerry, same thing, but no place in politics, no elective office that mitt romney holds. i don't see where he easily fits back into this party at this point. >> he can become a cable tv host. >> who knows. >> with one of those networks out there. what do you think? you think he has -- a lot of the republican party today -- >> he's gone, he's over, history. it w it sounded like a valedictory. he didn't talk about our cause will live, we're going to continue to fight in the future. it was sort of like he was going to recede, he had done it twice, he lost. there are a lot of people who regarded him as the transitional figurine when he was the nominee of the party. so i think he'll go back to business, maybe to bain capital, who knows. i don't see politics in his future. >> what about paul ryan? he's long been considered one of the rising stars of the republican congress. will he just pick up where he left off? or do you see him try to broaden out, claim the mantle of the party standard bearer? >> he has time. listen, he has something that is very hard for a hou
party would be fiscally conservative on foreign policy and military policy. and on social issues, we would be libertarian, we're going to say, we're going to stay out of your pocketbook and bedroom. and that party could be a majority party. >> people said -- >> sorry. go ahead. >> i think if we were running that way this time, we win by 4% or 5%. >> what about the tea party? there are people who say the tea party wanted pure candidates, i put that in quotes. your party lost some unlosable races, they may have cost republicans control of the senate. a lot of republicans have trouble bringing this issue up. >> i think what we really should try to do with the tea party, get them to figure out what are your priority issues? the whole reason they got established, was big government, heavy taxes, obama care, government trying to direct your life and allow a certain amount of flexibility on social issues. conservatism on foreign policy and allow people to disagree with each other, sort of in the ronald reagan mold, if you agree with me on eight out of ten issues you are my friend. somehow w
to driving foreign policy that can't be overlooked. >> eliot: tina? >> his speech at the convention was an audition piece. >> eliot: not every audition works. >> yes. that was a kerry no one saw before. i was -- in the stadium. people were kind of -- sighed when he got up there. he knocked it out of park. >> eliot: people remembered that. >> he was the surprise sleeper speaker. >> eliot: treasury, tim geithner leaving. does he take somebody from wall street? >> undoubtedly. >> eliot: you think he does? >> absolutely. >> eliot: come on! so many people understand banking finance better than those guys. >> yes. ralph nader. >> eliot: robert rice. i would put him in any cabinet position. host of new york 1 errol louis and editor tina but dupuy. our special election night of the view finder is ahead. more "viewpoint" coming up. [ forsythe ] we don't just come up here for the view up in alaska. it's the cleanest, clearest water. we find the best sweetest crab for red lobster that we can find. [ male announcer ] hur
, interestingly, to telescope a long argument, the area of greatest continuity in u.s. foreign policy since the time of nixon has been our dealings with china. where, on the one hand, we think it's better if they grow than if they don't. on the other hand, we have all sorts of problems with them. i think that is the way obama has pursued it and will keep pursuing it. so i think they actually are relieved to have a second term. >> what do they want from us? >> they want essentially a chance to develop. i -- >> you mean develop economically? >> develop economically. and just to sort of breathe. when i lived in japan, i was quite alarmed, and remain so, about sort of the zero-sumness of many of japan's economic ambitions, which sort of came out of american achievement. in china's case, i think it's different. it's a gigantic poor country where most people are still poor. the per capita income is still, like, one-fifth what it is in the united states. a lot of really rich people, but still they have more farmers than we have people. and it's a giant challenge. and so i think what they want is i
about another foreign policy expert, in this case condoleezza rice, back in 2005. here is mccain on susan rice. take a listen. >> susan rice should have known better, and if she didn't know better, she's not qualified. she should have known better. i will do everything in my power to block her from being the united states secretary of state. >> okay. mortal sin, deal breaker, end of her career because john mccain said she had gotten the wrong brief and delivered the wrong brief. however, mccain had a very different reaction back in 2005 when condoleezza rice was nominated for secretary of state despite her direct involvement in the country's iraq policy, mccain trucked up opposition to her nomination to bitter innocence over losing an election. interesting. let's watch. >> i wonder why we're starting this new congress with a protracted debate about a foregone conclusion. i can only conclude we're doing this for no other reason than because of lingering bitterness at the outcome of the elections. >> talk about a self-indictment. mccain was asked about the contradiction this mo
room to move on foreign policy, but the next few years will require tough positions. iran and a possible nuclear strike, the rise of china, climate change. >> if i can start with you, the republican party took quite a beating last night. what did the future look like? >> we certainly held on to the house, and the majority is still pretty substantial. >> this is a presidential election the republican party should have won but did not. >> we should have won. the economic circumstances are such we should have been able to win. what it says is the republican party it needs to be less a homogeneous party and more an inclusive party in the future. we have to figure out how to stick to the principles. we want to reach out more broadly than the parties are able to do. >> was this an election not so much about economic policy? it is frankly about demographics of this country. >> i think you have to give him a lot of credit in being able to show people while he did not solve the problems, he toiled in the trenches. i got the impression the american citizens thought obama did an earn
policy, jobs policy, foreign policy. it is all woven into the same fabric. you cannot talk about any one of those without talking about the rest of them. amerigas to bring a skill set to the next generation. -- america house to bring a skill sets to the next generation. we have to be a competitive generation. the amount of power is probably unprecedented in the world today. that does not mean that america is getting weaker. that should be good news to us. we have to rebuild our infrastructure and so on, but we are capable of doing that. most of the world looks to us to lead with allies in relationships, not dictate, not occupy, but to bring leadership along where we can find common interests. >> let's hope you are right. thank you so much. now to bravery and finally honored prepare. and -- finally honored. she was born into an indian family, but found herself working behind enemy lines tour world war ii. she was eventually captured and killed by the nazis. today, she is honored. here is a remarkable story. >> in a quiet london square where a young indian girl once played, a crowd of seve
.0 with respect to our foreign policy on israel and iran? because you had been sounding alarm bells about how the sanctions weren't going to do it, iran is moving towards a nuclear bomb, and if we don't step up the sanctions severely or do something else, you know, they're going to wind up with a nuke, or israel's going to act militarily? where do you see us now? >> well, i don't think anything has changed just because of our election on tuesday. i think the most likely outcome in the middle east remains that iran will get nuclear weapons unless israel or the united states acts militarily. i see zero chance the obama administration will do that, so people are necessarily concentrating on israel. i think president obama will put merciless pressure on israel not to use military force. i think he will try to affect the outcome of the israeli election in january and do what he can to make sure netanyahu's not reelected. that could include a very public discussion with iran bilaterally, it could include behind-the-scenes pressure. but i think the stakes are very high here. megyn: i want to talk to
-- institute. i'm delighted to see all of you today. i think the interest in foreign policy and the wake of our presidential election is evident by the standing room only crowd we have here today. we are now already into the process of transition, transition even with the same president. transitions are the most fluid and receptive moments in the presidential cycle that may have an impact on the policy process. so, i take it that it is a good sign that there is a much interest in the foreign-policy process by your presence here today. i think the transition from a first to second on the administration may begin the day after election, but it does not end on inauguration day. this process is going to continue for some time. as the new old team goes through the inevitable time of reassessment and redefinition of priorities and opportunities, and as other issues, domestic issues, but fiscal cliff for example, and packed for policy. let's not forget, as the world rick roberts to the changes -- or some people get -- some people say, a lack of changes -- here in washington. let's not forget that hist
go back to foreign policy in the next year and i think we're going to be writing and thinking and worrying a lot about iran. chris: iran again. yeah. >> the head of the republican party is going to run again for re-election and he will win because despite the failings of the campaign, people are satisfied with him. chris: good for him. i was talking the other day, that's the next woodward biggy. >> he's already printing bumper stickers. >> rock stars get as big a kick out of flying on air force one as everybody else does. bruce springsteen getting out of the motorcade to get on the plane on monday and he looked like a kid in a candy store. chris: did you like the spelling problem with his name the other day? >> what is up with that? i'm so embarrassed. >> chris christie cried when he hugged bruce springsteen. so, the benghazi postmore tells are not over and they're especially not over at the c.i.a. which is looking around the world to see how it can protect its people better and not rely on what proved to be, in the case of benghazi, very shaky militias and irregular forces. c
the financial crisis of four years ago, the chinese have been much more assertive in foreign policy, particularly in these territorial disputes in the south china sea. they have been saying some pretty outrageous things about for example the fact that none of the states in that area can talk to each other how to deal with a rising tide of. they all have to deal with china bilaterally. >> a party theorist ones that the real threat to china lies in the american encouragement of rights lawyers, underground religious activists, dissidents, a vulnerable groups. when this list was published, there was outrage because of the overtones with mao era which ones. there is no problem of democratic accountability at all. >> china will evolve its own type of democracy, whether at the west except it or not. i'd describe it this as some kind of election of a the past 2000, 200 years since china was traded to. at the top level, it is always a unified confusion. we havwithout this type of structure, the country will disintegrate. what is the greatest fear in your life, it would be chaos. >> right on
: i just wanted to say the foreign policy of obama is a spitting image of bush. we have droned more pakistan as than bush under obama. it is only creating more terrorists. we see what is going on with the arab spring . they are electing these islamists. there is a blow back. host: let's take a look at a story on some overseas news. it says -- and other international story -- you can see this image coming to us from "the new york times." more news on the political and domestic front. president obama pressed for higher taxes but he adds caveats. is it president obama met with business leaders. the headline from "the washington journal -- the wall street journal." looking at the republican side of the fiscal house, republicans say the plan must be bolder. house republicans say paul ryan will continue to be a major player after his failed bid as mitt romney's running mate. the budget he pushed through no longer does enough to clean up the nation's fiscal miss. in the race for congressman alan west's house seat -- one more political story -- former presidential candidate obama wins presi
in the foreign policy land. many liberals would have a critique of some of his lack of process in some of the foreign policy stuff. is part of what he's saying that the recalcitrance of the republican house might bring out that aspect of president obama? >> well, i think there are two things. first, i think steve is absolutely correct. the republicans forced his hand. by showing that they were going to be entrenched opposition that could not be reformed or changed, he had to assert himself. the debt ceiling debacle was the place where it all came together because i think the country saw how the resistance would not move and his progressive allies were profoundly disappointed that he was, in fact, rolled by the republican issue. so i think in the foreign policy realm he was determined to show that as a democratic president he could be strong and obviously his effort to get osama bin laden was a big piece of that. but his policy towards syria, his policy toward the iraq war, his effort with afghanistan was all designed to blunt that effort. >> that's true. >> as much as he is committed t
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 123 (some duplicates have been removed)